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Seipp's Best Mug

$10.00
Large mug great for beer or coffee featuring vintage Seipp's advertising slogan. Put one in the freezer in advance of a cold beer!
Availability: In stock
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Conrad Seipp immigrated to the United States from Hesse, Germany in the late 1840's. During his first few years in the U.S., Conrad earned his living as a beer wagon driver and farmer. He eventually started his own brewery in the late 1860's and be 1872 was the largest provider of beer in the United States. The Seipp Brewery was a major player in the beer business until Prohibition.

After the success of his brewery, Seipp built a large mansion on the south shore of Lake Geneva in Wisconsin. The 20-room Queen Anne style "cottage" was complete in 1888 for $20,000, and today, it is one of the Wisconsin Historical Society's historic sites, a popular tourist destination near Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.


Mug Reads: "Just a little better" than the kind you thought was best.


Size: 11 oz

Dishwasher safe.

Conrad Seipp immigrated to the United States from Hesse, Germany in the late 1840's. During his first few years in the U.S., Conrad earned his living as a beer wagon driver and farmer. He eventually started his own brewery in the late 1860's and be 1872 was the largest provider of beer in the United States. The Seipp Brewery was a major player in the beer business until Prohibition.

After the success of his brewery, Seipp built a large mansion on the south shore of Lake Geneva in Wisconsin. The 20-room Queen Anne style "cottage" was complete in 1888 for $20,000, and today, it is one of the Wisconsin Historical Society's historic sites, a popular tourist destination near Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.


Mug Reads: "Just a little better" than the kind you thought was best.


Size: 11 oz

Dishwasher safe.

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