(608)261-9366
(608)261-9366

Tents, Tigers, and the Ringling Brothers

Tents, Tigers, and the Ringling Brothers
Tents, Tigers, and the Ringling Brothers
Paperback: $12.95
128 pages, 81 illus., 1 map, 7 x 9"
ISBN: 9780870203749

Published by Wisconsin Historical Society Press

Orders for Trade, Library or Wholesale
Price: $12.95
You Might Also Like ...
Check the check boxes next to the additional products that you would like to add to the shopping cart, then click on the "Add to Cart" button above. A check box is not shown if a product requires that you select an option or fill out a field. () indicates a required accessory.
Product Details
By: Jerry Apps

This addition to the Badger Biographies series for young readers features the story of the young Ringling brothers of circus fame. The book tells the inspiring story of the seven sons of German and French immigrants who were guided by their dreams to escape poverty through hard work and ambition.

These entrepreneurial brothers moved with their parents to Baraboo, Wisconsin where their fantastic circus adventure began. With no prior circus experience, the brothers tackled one of the riskiest businesses of the time. Each brother contributed his unique talents to make their enterprise successful.

These entrepreneurial brothers moved with their parents to Baraboo, Wisconsin where their fantastic circus adventure began. With no prior circus experience, the brothers tackled one of the riskiest businesses of the time. Each brother contributed his unique talents to make their enterprise successful.


Jerry Apps is professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the author of more than twenty-five books, many of them on rural history and country life. Jerry's nonfiction books include "Every Farm Tells a Story," "Living a Country Year," "Ringlingville USA," and many others. erry was born and raised on a small farm in Waushara County, Wisconsin, about two miles from the land that is the subject of "Old Farm." He and his family have owned their farm, Roshara, since 1966, and he and his wife, Ruth, continue to live there part time. Once a small dairy farm, the property is now a tree farm with an ongoing prairie renovation.