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Ojibwe Dreamcatcher

$24.95
These Sweetwater Creations Dreamcatchers are certified to be Native American made. Dreamcatchers are made by an enrolled member of a federally recognized tribe of the US and handcrafts all items. Colors and styles vary. Each is unique. The photos are representative samples.
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These dreamcatchers are certified to be Native American made. Dreamcatchers are made by an enrolled member of a federally recognized tribe of the U.S. who handcrafts all items.

  • Diameter: 7 Inches
  • Artist: Robert Sweet
  • Company: Sweetwater Creations
  • Tribe: Bad River Band of Chippewa

Colors and Styles Vary: Each dreamcatcher is unique! The photos shown here are not the actual items that will be shipped. Colors and designs vary, and they cannot all be shown here online. When you purchase online, you will receive an authentic Dreamcatcher designed by Robert Sweet.

Ojibwe Dreamcatcher Legend

Long ago, when all the Ojibwe clans used to live in one central location, Asibikaashi (Spider Woman) took care of all of her people by weaving each child a magical web. When the Ojibwe Nation dispersed to the four corners of North America, Asibikaashi had a difficult time making her journey to all of her children, so the mothers, sisters, and Nokomis (grandmothers) took up the practive of weaving the webs for the new babies using willow hoops and sinew or cordage made from plants. It is in shape of a circle to represent how giizis (the sun) travels each day across the sky. The dreamcatcher will filter out all the bad bawedjigewin (dreams) and allow only good thoughts to enter into our minds when we are just abinooji (children). You will see a small hole in the center of each dream catchers where those good bawadjige may come through. With the first rays of sunlight, the bad dreams would perish. When we see Asibikaashi, we should not fear her but instead respect and protect her. This is the legend of the dreamcatcher.




These dreamcatchers are certified to be Native American made. Dreamcatchers are made by an enrolled member of a federally recognized tribe of the U.S. who handcrafts all items.

  • Diameter: 7 Inches
  • Artist: Robert Sweet
  • Company: Sweetwater Creations
  • Tribe: Bad River Band of Chippewa

Colors and Styles Vary: Each dreamcatcher is unique! The photos shown here are not the actual items that will be shipped. Colors and designs vary, and they cannot all be shown here online. When you purchase online, you will receive an authentic Dreamcatcher designed by Robert Sweet.

Ojibwe Dreamcatcher Legend

Long ago, when all the Ojibwe clans used to live in one central location, Asibikaashi (Spider Woman) took care of all of her people by weaving each child a magical web. When the Ojibwe Nation dispersed to the four corners of North America, Asibikaashi had a difficult time making her journey to all of her children, so the mothers, sisters, and Nokomis (grandmothers) took up the practive of weaving the webs for the new babies using willow hoops and sinew or cordage made from plants. It is in shape of a circle to represent how giizis (the sun) travels each day across the sky. The dreamcatcher will filter out all the bad bawedjigewin (dreams) and allow only good thoughts to enter into our minds when we are just abinooji (children). You will see a small hole in the center of each dream catchers where those good bawadjige may come through. With the first rays of sunlight, the bad dreams would perish. When we see Asibikaashi, we should not fear her but instead respect and protect her. This is the legend of the dreamcatcher.




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