You have no items in your shopping cart.

Historical Brewing Techniques: The Lost Art of Farmhouse Brewing

$24.95
Learn about ancient brewing methods that originated in remote areas of northern Europe.
Availability: In stock
- +

Author

Lars Marius Garshol

Summary

Written by Lars Marius Garshol, a Norwegian who researched brewing traditions and methods at remote farmhouses throughout Scandinavia and the Baltic countries. The book brings readers along for a journey that is equal parts history, cultural anthropology, social science, and travelogue, all through the lens of beer.

In the book, Garshol writes about kveik, a strain of yeast which has diverse and appealing properties, such as tolerating a wide variety of temperatures and fermenting beer to completion in just 36 hours. Garshol’s work documenting the yeast has convinced today’s suppliers to sell kveik in the U.S. and has inspired craft brewers to experiment with it.

“‘Farmhouse ale’ is a term used by many yet fully appreciated by few. Lars Garshol is one who gets it, and he shares his wealth of knowledge in this book,” said Stephen Beaumont, co-author of The World Atlas of Beer and author of Will Travel for Beer. “It’s not a beer style guide, but rather a fascinating look into the myriad ways beer was made prior to industrialization. It’s a compelling read for brewers and beer aficionados alike.”

Details

  • Paperback
  • Book size:  10" high x 7" wide
  • 400 pages
  • Full color photos and illustrations
  • Published by Brewers Publications, 2020

Author

Lars Marius Garshol

Summary

Written by Lars Marius Garshol, a Norwegian who researched brewing traditions and methods at remote farmhouses throughout Scandinavia and the Baltic countries. The book brings readers along for a journey that is equal parts history, cultural anthropology, social science, and travelogue, all through the lens of beer.

In the book, Garshol writes about kveik, a strain of yeast which has diverse and appealing properties, such as tolerating a wide variety of temperatures and fermenting beer to completion in just 36 hours. Garshol’s work documenting the yeast has convinced today’s suppliers to sell kveik in the U.S. and has inspired craft brewers to experiment with it.

“‘Farmhouse ale’ is a term used by many yet fully appreciated by few. Lars Garshol is one who gets it, and he shares his wealth of knowledge in this book,” said Stephen Beaumont, co-author of The World Atlas of Beer and author of Will Travel for Beer. “It’s not a beer style guide, but rather a fascinating look into the myriad ways beer was made prior to industrialization. It’s a compelling read for brewers and beer aficionados alike.”

Details

  • Paperback
  • Book size:  10" high x 7" wide
  • 400 pages
  • Full color photos and illustrations
  • Published by Brewers Publications, 2020

Write your own review
*
*
  • Bad
  • Excellent
*
*
*
*
Product tags
Customers who bought this item also bought
Blue-grey socks with colorful birds: robin, chickadee, and blue jay

Women's Crew Socks

From birds & bees to mac & cheese, our women's socks are a soft, cotton blend with comfortable stretch. As fun to give as to receive.
$10.00
Holstein black and white cow-print socks with an udder pink colored toe

Men's Crew Socks

Blending comfort with style, these crew socks with styles from trout to campfire look great with dress shoes and slacks or shorts!
$12.00
Birding Journal cover with four pictures of different birds and a pencil.

Birding Journal

Document and learn about the birds you see each season. Take your birdwatching to the next level with this illustrated journal!
$12.95
Harley and the Davidsons: Motorcycle Legends

Harley and the Davidsons: Motorcycle Legends

Paperback: $12.95
112 pages, 76 b/w photos & illus., 7 x 9"
ISBN:9780870203800

Published by Wisconsin Historical Society Press

Ordering for retail, wholesale, school, library, or other tax-exempt organization?
$12.95

You Make A Difference

100% of our proceeds support the wisconsin historical society

Get History Delivered To Your Inbox

Sign up for the Wisconsin Historical Society Newsletter